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dc.contributor.author Jackson, Ronald L. II en
dc.contributor.author Camara, Sakile Kai en
dc.contributor.editor Alridge, Derrick P. en
dc.contributor.editor Stewert, James B. en
dc.contributor.editor Franklin, V.P. en
dc.date.accessioned 2013-06-21T18:52:47Z en
dc.date.available 2013-06-21T18:52:47Z en
dc.date.issued 2010 en
dc.identifier.citation Message in the Music: Hip Hop, History, and Pedagogy : 178-203. en
dc.identifier.isbn 978-0976811145 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.2/3359 en
dc.description.abstract Feminist film critics maintain that the dominant look in cinema is, historically, a gendered gaze. More precisely, this viewpoint argues that the dominant visual and narrative conventions of filmmaking generally fix "women as image" and "men as bearer of the image." I would like to suggest that Hollywood cinema also frames a highly particularized racial gaze-that is, a representational system that positions Blacks as image and Whites as bearer of the image. en
dc.format.extent 26 pages en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Association for the Study of African American Life and History en
dc.rights Copyright 2010 ASALH en
dc.subject Hip-hop feminism. en
dc.subject Black film en
dc.subject Hip-hop--Social aspects. en
dc.title Scripting and consuming black bodies in hip hop music and pimp movies en
dc.type Book chapter en


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