Lyra, Wladimir

 
 

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Dr. Wladimir Lyra, Professor of Physics and Astronomy

Contact Information

Wladimir Lyra
Department of Physics and Astronomy
California State University,
18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge, CA 91330-8268
Phone: 818-677-7464
Email: w.lyra@csun.edu

More about this author.

Copyright

Works in CSUN ScholarWorks are made available exclusively for educational purposes such as research or instruction. Literary rights, including copyright for published works held by the creator(s) or their heirs, or other third parties may apply. All rights are reserved unless otherwise indicated by the copyright owner(s).

Recent Submissions

  • Lyra, Wladimir (AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 2012)
    Debris disks should not be completely gas-free, since there is second generation gas from outgassing of planetesimals and dust grains via sublimation, photodesorption, or collisions, generating a system of dust-to-gas ratio ...
  • Lyra, Wladimir (Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2012, 2012)
    This work presents 3D resistive magnetohydrodynamical models of the solar nebula, showing that the region between magnetically active and dead zones is prone to the excitation of vortices, that effectively form planetary ...
  • McKernan, Barry; Ford, S.; Kocsis, B.; Lyra, Wladimir (American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts# 223, 2014)
    Stellar mass black hole seeds can rapidly grow into intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in accretion disks around supermassive black holes. Initial seed growth is dominated by collisions with stars and later seed growth ...
  • Richert, Alex; Kuchner, Marc; Lyra, Wladimir (American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts, 2017)
    The discovery of gas in debris disks has raised the question of whether gas-dust interactions can observably affect global disk structure. This has important implications for identifying planets in debris disks, as well ...
  • Mordecai-Mark, MacLow; Lyra, Wladimir; Paardekooper, S. (Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, 2010)
    A planet interacting with a gas disk by gravitation drives density perturbations in the disk that in turn exert a gravitational torque on the planet that cause it to migrate in orbital radius. Planets smaller than gas ...