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dc.contributor.author ben Asher, Moshe en
dc.contributor.author bat Sarah, Khulda en
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-02T18:58:57Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-02T18:58:57Z
dc.date.issued 2018 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/202460
dc.description.abstract The starting place to understand the relationship between sugar and medicine is obesity. What precisely is obesity? It certainly means to be 'grossly' overweight, because of an excess of body fat. But how do we know if we or someone else fits the definition of obesity? Just looking at oneself or someone else is one way to verify obesity. But it's the body mass index that defines the clinical obesity recognized by the health professions and insurance industry. The body mass index or BMI standardizes measurement of body-fat health-effects in relation to height and weight. en
dc.format.extent 8 pages en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Gather the People en
dc.rights Copyright 2018 en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/ en
dc.subject Obesity en
dc.subject BMI en
dc.subject Metabolic syndrome en
dc.subject Public health policy en
dc.subject Sugar en
dc.subject Big Food en
dc.title A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down' - but not as we might imagine! en
dc.type Article en
dc.rights.license Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 United States en


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  • ben Asher, Moshe [20]
    Collection of scholarship submitted Moshe Ben Asher, Part-time Faculty for CSUN Sociology Department
  • Faculty Publications [3318]
    Collection of scholarship submitted by CSUN faculty

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Copyright 2018 Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright 2018

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