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dc.contributor.author Moon, Nathan W. en
dc.contributor.author Griffiths, Patricia C. en
dc.contributor.author LaForce, Salimah en
dc.contributor.author Linden, Maureen en
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-26T19:10:56Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-26T19:10:56Z
dc.date.issued 2020 en
dc.identifier.citation Journal on Technology and Persons with Disabilities 8: 196-209. en
dc.identifier.issn 2330-4219 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/215988 en
dc.description 35th Annual Assistive Technology Conference Scientific/Research Proceedings, San Diego, 2020 en
dc.description.abstract We present findings from the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Inclusive Technologies (Wireless RERC) Survey of User Needs (SUN) for 2017-2018. The Wireless RERC has surveyed wireless technology adoption and use among individuals with disabilities since 2002, and this article presents findings from the sixth iteration of the SUN. Broadly, it continues to find growing rates of adoption of smartphone technologies among people with disabilities relative to the general population. With an increase of smartphone use among individuals with disabilities from 54% in 2012-2013 and 71% in 2015-2016, to 88% in 2017-2018, our findings suggest further narrowing of the digital "disability divide." SUN respondents generally indicated that their devices were easy to use. Regarding device satisfaction, over three-fourths of smartphone users indicated that they were satisfied or very satisfied with their smartphones. Relatively less established, newer features such as real-time-text and intelligent personal assistants have yet to be widely adopted. However, the higher-than-average use of real-time-text among individuals who reported deafness or difficulty hearing suggests this features' potential for increasing usability and accessibility of these devices, specifically, and communications, in general. For this version, we added new questions on the adoption and use of next-generation wireless devices, as part of a growing trend toward Internet of Things (IoT)-based "smart homes." en
dc.format application/pdf en
dc.format.extent 14 pages en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher California State University, Northridge. en
dc.rights Copyright 2020 by the authors and California State University, Northridge en
dc.subject Smartphones en
dc.subject wireless devices en
dc.subject intelligent personal assistants en
dc.subject emerging assistive technologies en
dc.subject information and communications technology (ICT) en
dc.subject software en
dc.title Wireless Device Use by Individuals with Disabilities: Findings from a National Survey en
dc.type Article en
dc.rights.license Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 4.0 Unported License. en


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