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dc.contributor.author Brewer, Sarah en
dc.date.accessioned 2021-07-21T20:35:17Z
dc.date.available 2021-07-21T20:35:17Z
dc.date.issued 2021 en
dc.identifier.citation The California Geographer 60: 121-130. en
dc.identifier.issn 0575-5700 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/221210
dc.description.abstract There has never been an easy way over the steep and rugged terrain of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Even today, far too many zippy Silicon Valley commuters meet their demise as they weave around sluggish trucks on the treacherous Highway 17. The highway rapidly changed the cultural landscape. It was not the only way "over the hill." Its completion in 1940 led to a widespread abandonment of towns, roads, and railroads in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Towns that were once busy stagecoach or railroad stops now lie deep in watery graves below human-made reservoirs or have been incinerated by wildfire, never rebuilt. Rails and ties from the short lived South Pacific Coast Railroad (1880-1940) have all been removed. Only faint dirt roads that once were railroad grades, along with the haunting portals of the perilous mile-long railroad tunnels, remain to tell the story. en
dc.format application/pdf en
dc.format.extent 10 pages en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher California Geographical Society en
dc.rights Copyright 2021 by the California Geographical Society en
dc.subject Ghost towns en
dc.subject Santa Cruz Mountains en
dc.subject Fieldwork en
dc.title Field Notes from the Santa Cruz Mountains: Mapping Ghost Towns en
dc.type Article en


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