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dc.contributor.author Fichten, Catherine en
dc.contributor.author Jorgensen, Mary en
dc.contributor.author Havel, Alice en
dc.contributor.author Vo, Christine en
dc.contributor.author Libman, Eva en
dc.date.accessioned 2022-06-20T21:01:32Z
dc.date.available 2022-06-20T21:01:32Z
dc.date.issued 2022 en
dc.identifier.citation Journal on Technology and Persons with Disabilities 10: 97-114. en
dc.identifier.issn 2330-4219 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/223468
dc.description 37th Annual Assistive Technology Conference Scientific/Research Proceedings, online 2022 en
dc.description.abstract We present eight studies dealing with artificial intelligence and mobile apps that assist post-secondary students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other disabilities with their academic work. Study 1, based on an advisory board and on a Google search, provided glowing testimonials about AI tools. However, Study 2, a scoping review of the scientific literature, showed that research is scant. In Study 3 we explored how students with and without disabilities used AI-based intelligent virtual assistants to do schoolwork. Our findings show that students are not realizing the potential of these tools. In Study 4, we explored AI-based technologies used by 163 students with and 74 students without disabilities and in Study 5 we investigated AI-based technologies professors required students to use. These studies helped identify sustainable practices. In studies 6, 7 and 8 we explored apps for students with ADHD. Overall, the results show that students with and without disabilities use similar technologies. There will always be a place for traditional assistive technologies such as Jaws and ZoomText. However, general use technologies play an important role because the most common disabilities reported by students on post-secondary campuses include nonvisible disabilities, such as ADHD, mental and chronic health challenges, and specific learning disorders. en
dc.format application/pdf en
dc.format.extent 17 pages en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher California State University, Northridge. en
dc.rights Copyright 2022 by the authors and California State University, Northridge en
dc.subject AI en
dc.subject artificial intelligence en
dc.subject post-secondary students with disabilities en
dc.subject college en
dc.subject university en
dc.subject ADHD en
dc.subject Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder en
dc.subject mobile apps en
dc.title AI-Based and Mobile Apps: Eight Studies Based on Post-Secondary Students' Experiences en
dc.type Article en
dc.rights.license Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 4.0 Unported License. en


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